Don’t Waste Time Feeling Sorry For Yourself

Zaid K. Dahhaj
6 min readApr 26, 2018

Self-pity is easily the most destructive of the non-pharmaceutical narcotics; it is addictive, gives momentary pleasure and separates the victim from reality.” (John Gardner)

Photo by Alex Iby on Unsplash

We all experience pain and sorrow in life. And although sadness is a normal, healthy emotion, dwelling on your sorrow and misfortune is self-destructive. Do you respond positively to any of the points below?

You tend to think your problems are worse than anyone else’s.

If it weren’t for bad luck, you’re pretty sure you’d have none at all.

Problems seem to add up for you at a much faster rate than anyone else.

You’re fairly certain that no one else truly understands how hard your life really is.

You sometimes choose to withdraw from leisure activities and social engage- ments so you can stay home and think about your problems.

You’re more likely to tell people what went wrong during your day rather than what went well.

You often complain about things not being fair.

You struggle to find anything to be grateful for sometimes.

You think that other people are blessed with easier lives.

You sometimes wonder if the world is out to get you.

Can you see yourself in some of the examples above? Self-pity can consume you until it eventually changes your thoughts and behaviors. But you can choose to take control. Even when you can’t alter your circumstances, you can alter your attitude.

Why We Feel Sorry For Ourselves

If self-pity is so destructive, why do we do it in the first place? And why is it some- times so easy and even comforting to indulge in a pity party?

It’s so easy to fall into the self-pity trap. As long as you feel sorry for yourself, you can delay any circumstances…

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Zaid K. Dahhaj

Sleep King. Helping family men fix fatigue in less than 42 days without letting loved ones suffer. Founder: The 2AM Podcast.